Quilt Patterns

Scrap Quilt Patterns

santa quilt patterns

Learn the Basics of Quilting

Beginner Quilting Lessons

  • Make a Christmas Quilt - In part one of this beginning quilting lesson learn how to cut the fabric and piece the top together. Coming soon, the Santa Claus applique.

Scrap quilt patterns are a fun and easy way to use your leftover fabric. Any quilter knows that pieces of fabric are easy to accumulate once you start making quilts. There will be times when you have an assortment of fabric ranging in sizes and styles. Scrap quilt patterns are great because you can use all this fabric, no mater the design to make a comforter or bedspread.

Quiltmakers tend to stock pile fabric for situations just like this. Once you complete a project you may have a few pieces lying around from blocks or squares that you cut out. Instead of throwing them away, you can be sustainable and find a new use for what others could see as trash.

Reusing materials to create something new isn't an unheard of practice for quilters. Even beginner quilters learn that saving fabric pays off in the long run. Cutting, tearing and pulling together fabric pieces can be placed together to create unique quilts.

People who want to make a quilt, comforter, bedspread or even a wall hanging aim to create something unique. Quilting is unlike other crafts that require that every line be followed and every letter crossed or dotted. When you make scrap quilt patterns you have a little more leeway than a cross stitch or even a puzzle would allow you.

From Simple Leftovers Come Masterpieces

The fun thing about scrap quilt patterns is there are no set designs. The wider the assortment of fabric the better your scrap quilts will look and feel. Grab the pieces that have floral, polka dot, stripes, triangles or even different material all together to get your project set up.

Variety is going to play a key role in determining the shape of your scrap quilt patterns. When you have a large scrap pile that gives you an assortment of colors, sizes and designs then you are going to have more to choose from. If you are just beginning to make scrap quilt patterns though, you do not have to worry about having enough scraps.

Quilters can pick up scrap fabric for cheap at a craft store. Often times material is set to the side and offered as a discount. You can get a wide range of assortment doing it this way and it can help add to your scrap quilt patterns without having to spend a lot of money. Making scrap quilt patterns should be cheap anyway so you do not want to spend the same amount of money on these patterns as you would other designs most likely.

Turn Scraps into Designs

Making designs is easy when you know what you want to do. Think about why you want to make a quilt and then you will be able to pick scrap patterns very easily. Less time debating with yourself and more time being certain of what you want to do will open the doors for possibilities.

Types of scrap quilt patterns include:

  • Four Patch Log Cabin
  • Block
  • Crumbs
  • Seattle View
  • Baby

You can pretty much use all sorts of designs and layouts with your scrap material. Even the type of fabric is not going to matter. Scraps can be used for log cabin, appliqué, block and even Amish quilt patterns. An easy way to follow designs is just by using a repeating block or creating a single shape.

When you look at the different scrap quilt patterns you want to see if it will fit the purpose of the quilt. For instance, a quiltmaker will most likely not choose a crib pattern or infant design for a young adult leaving for college. Keeping the purpose in mind will help you not only create a pattern, but stay focused as well.

Quilting is a lot of fun and one of the best things about making a comforter or bedspread is getting together with other quilters. Scrap quilt patterns are especially good for novice quiltmakers that can learn from people who have been sewing for years or decades. Taking a beginning quilting class can help you learn how to make all sorts of designs and follow a pattern without needing to be so exact. While some designs need you to watch every line and crease, you can have a little fun with scrap quilt patterns.

Color You Finished

Any designer knows that color matters. When you thought about what type of paint to use for the living room or your bedroom you gathered samples. Making a scrap quilt is no different. Imagining how something will look is good, but sometimes you need to paint a swatch. The color flow in a quilt is very important because it can tie into the overall feel for the fabric or pillow.

Quilters at every skill level can gain something just by simply laying out their squares before they put in the first stitch. It will also help you envision the final product even more so you can make your scrap turn into something extraordinary.

Even though the patterns on your scrap fabric may be different, that doesn't mean they cannot be used together. Understanding the correlation between colors will help you place your triangles, fauna, dots, lines and other patterns in an aesthetically pleasing relationship.

A good tip is to use your complimentary colors. There are two different categories that a color can have. A quilters fabric that are yellow, red and blue will serve as primary colors. Purple, green and orange are secondary colors. They are called secondary colors because they cannot be made unless there is a primary color.

Knowing how to place your colors throughout your scrap quilt patterns will help you figure out what to do with the pieces of scrap fabric that have a different print size. Some pieces of fabrics may tiny flowers for example, while alternatively you could find a piece of fabric that has a large flower. Depending on the color of the quilt designs you could space them out through the quilt as accent colors.

A quilter that has a lot of dark colors for example could use a large red star or yellow flower to attract the eye either vertically, horizontally or diagonal. This can add depth to your designs making your scrap quilt patterns even appear three dimensional because of your trick of eye.

The value of your color is going to add to your quilt's mood. It may seem ridiculous but colors represent emotions. That means if you want a quilt that is going to be used in a relaxing environment such as a napping, then you don't need loud vibrant colors. A soft pastel or stream of blues can give a relaxing feel. You will also want to make sure your cool and warm colors mix well so they do not clash.

The scrap quilt patterns you use to make pillows, throws, comforters are going to be used for years to come. Quilting is a way to make memories and tell your story. Even when you don't have a set pattern or design to follow, you can still relay a message. Choose your scrap quilt patterns online and see what you can create today.